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Thread: Let me introduce you RyZen - newest AMD desktop CPUs

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by lefty View Post
    I'm quite interested in what the R3 will be though. The R5 is obviously just the R7 with two cores fused off. That makes it more difficult for AMD to make good margins, because of die costs.
    I'm guessing that the R3 will be a desktop version of Raven Ridge (i.e. the laptop chip). The other options are to use the R7 die and fuse off 4 cores (bad idea because of die costs), or use a complete different die with only 4 cores and no iGPU (unlikely, because AMD don't have resources to create so many dies)
    Both R5 and R3 are basically just not fully working R7 dice. So your point about losing money because of the increased die size is not really valid. If one core is not working or a portion of the cache is damaged, they can just ship the R7 as an R5 or R3. It would have been wasted silicon anyway, so actually it is a very smart idea (Intel does of course the same). My guess is that the R7 prime yield is already quite high, so they had not enough downgraded parts to make a proper R5 and the R3 launch since day 1 (and very likely they will sell far more of them, since the mid and low end market is much bigger than the enthusiast one). The binning is instead the way they differentiate the different frequency offerings.
    When the Raven Ridge APU chip is ready, there might be another option to get more R3s. Yes, all the defective GPU dice could also make working R3 CPUs.
    Anyway, your idea of disabling working portion of the chips is not so uncommon either. But in this case it is going to happen only in case of stellar yields and a very low market for the R7.

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  2. #12
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    Yeah, I know the concept of binning, but I reckon that there simply aren't enough defective R7 dies to support both the R5 and R3 product lines.
    The R3 is a budget part and budget buyers are going to want a iGPU to save on costs of buying discreet GPU. It makes more sense to me that they use a desktop version of Raven Ridge. Notice also R3 and Raven Ridge are both in 2nd half - that's why they're not releasing it at same time as R5.

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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by lefty View Post
    Notice also R3 and Raven Ridge are both in 2nd half - that's why they're not releasing it at same time as R5.
    I do not disagree in principle, but it could be simply be that they get more R5 than R3 from a defective R7, since at the end it is just a matter of chances. So they just need more time to build a proper stock level.
    Second point (about the lack of iGPU). Raven Ridge aims at the laptop segment, very true, but nothing stops AMD to use the exact same chip also for desktops.
    Depending on the binning, an R7 can be a 95W+ 1800X or a less power hungry 65W 1700, but in principle is exactly the same chip with the same process flow. So a 15W/35W laptop APU, could be used as a desktop APU by just increasing the clock and making it a 65W part.

    Zen is a single design which can scale across chips for everything from thin fanless notebooks to high-powered workstations and servers. AMD is particularly proud of this, saying that performance scales in an almost perfectly linear fashion.

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  4. #14
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    It should not last that long though, if 7nm from GF is really seeing the light as per plan. 7nm from Intel, is coming much later then GF 7nm. Yielding faster and delivering is everything.

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