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  • Yamaha Selecting Audio/Voice DSP Architecture?

    …or Chongquing CYIT Communication Technology Co Ltd. Both of them have recently licensed the CEVA-TeakLite-4 DSP, the latest for its multi-mode wireless baseband chips targeting 4G terminals, including smartphones and tablets (CYIT) and Yamaha to address the need to run increasingly complex voice pre-processing algorithms, advanced audio post-processing, and always-on voice activation, a must-have feature in today's high-end smartphones, all at extremely lower power. Going 15 years back, I remember the first time that I have heard about the TEAK DSP core, when Atmel co-designing with WaveCom a Baseband processor through an ASIC flow…

    EDA industry leader Jim Fiebiger died on November 26, 2011-yamaha-logo-jpg

    We are now talking about the fourth generation of the CEVA-TeakLite family, the CEVA-TeakLite-4. This DSP core is a low-power, native 32-bit, variable 10-stage pipeline, fixed-point DSP architecture framework, fully synthesizable, process-independent design that allows the SoC designer to select the optimal implementation in terms of silicon area, power consumption, and operating frequency. As you can see on the above picture, the CEVA-TeakLite-4 can be implemented to support 4G Baseband. According with Mr.Daqin Peng, Marketing Director at CYIT. “The ultra-low power CEVA-TeakLite-4 DSP offers us the optimal platform on which to develop our LTE terminal chips, providing outstanding performance and flexibility and capable of handling a wide array of audio, voice and baseband processing tasks.”


    EDA industry leader Jim Fiebiger died on November 26, 2011-01-ceva-teaklite-family-use-cases-jpg

    The CEVA-TeakLite-4 versatility also allows addressing the need to run increasingly complex voice pre-processing algorithms, advanced audio post-processing, and always-on voice activation, a must-have feature in today's high-end smartphones, all at extremely lower power. The CEVA-TeakLite-4 DSP architecture is complemented by a set of instructions specific to audio/voice processing, and Yamaha Corporation is strongly focusing on these audio/voice segments. “Our comprehensive selection process has led us to understand clearly that the CEVA-TeakLite-4 cores have the industry-leading audio/voice DSP architecture, the smallest footprint, and the best power efficiency for mobile product ICs,” said Nobukazu Nakamura, Manager of Strategic Marketing Department, Semiconductor Division, Yamaha Corporation. “We continue to work together with CEVA for the continual advancement of our audio/voice product roadmap, integrating leading-edge technologies, yet achieving better performance and greater power efficiency at the same time.”

    EDA industry leader Jim Fiebiger died on November 26, 2011-05-ceva-teaklite-4-dsp-family-members-jpg

    If you look at the above table, the CEVA-TL410 audio DSP core is probably the basic choice for Yamaha, like for a majority of chip makers targeting audio/voice segments, as CEVA is continuously growing market share in these segments, according withGideon Wertheizer, CEO of CEVA. The CEVA-TeakLite-4 is the most successful licensable DSP architecture in the history of the semiconductor industry, with more than 3 billion audio/voice chips shipped, over 100 licensees, 30 active ecosystem partners and more than 100 audio and voice software packages available.

    EDA industry leader Jim Fiebiger died on November 26, 2011-ceva-teaklite-4_bd-gif

    The CEVA-TL410 DSP core has been designed with a primary target of standalone audio DSP chips used to implement audio CODECs, audio D-Class amplifiers, and noise-reduction chips. The ultra-low-power CEVA-TL410 audio DSP core offers the smallest die size with its single 32x32-bit MAC, dual 16x16-bit MACs, and direct memory interface. If higher performance is required, the CEVA-TL411 audio DSP core provides dual 32x32-bit MACs and quad 16x16-bit MACs.

    If you want to get the full picture of CEVA’s portfolio, just take a look at CEVA powered product

    From Eric Esteve from IPNEST

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